Mosman House, SAOTA and TKD Architects

Project details
Architect: SAOTA TKD Architects
Town: Mosman, Sydney

Set on the slopes of Mosman, Sydney SAOTA and TKD Architects have designed a five bedroom family home, inspired by the films of David Lynch, that maximises dramatic views and capitalises on the area's warm climate, creating a space that blurs the divide between indoor-outdoor. Other features include a sauna, gym, wine cellar, and a cinema room.

The property is built over two adjacent sites to provide large open living areas and access to views. The interiors, provided by Alexandra Kidd Design, play with raw material; brushed concrete contrasts with warm wood panelling, bronze interior features, and sandstone cladding, whilst nods to nature can be found in the single piece, rough carved, monolithic stone kitchen island and the recurrence of foliage throughout the house.

“As Executive Architects, TKD worked closely with the client, ensuring that SAOTA’s detailed design was delivered and a dream home realized. Their creativity and commitment to design excellence was a key success factor,” said SAOTA Junior Associate, Erin Gibbs.

Recessed into the hillside, the house is accessible from two streets, the main living area is located below street level to offer maximum privacy, and the guest entrance is on the upper level, and can be reached by a bridge that crosses the garden below.
A double volume entrance hall establishes drama, as the eye is drawn right through the house out onto the terrace, and secluded garden, with views across Sydney Harbour. 

On the main level, the outdoor space includes a covered outdoor lounge and dining area, as well as bedrooms which float above the underlying platforms. A shallow water feature that wraps the area establishes a topology with the Harbour, and blue accents throughout the house and gardens achieve further visual harmony with the ocean views. On the lower level, a covered outdoor area leads directly to the pool and hot tub.

The approach to privacy is multi-layered. Angled bronzed louvres are used to maximise views out while minimising views inwards. Further motorised screening adjacent to the entrance allows the option of maximum light when open or privacy from the street when closed.


Image credit: © Justin Alexander