Growing Communities


Soapbox talks

3
Jun
2016
 
1
15
PM

In celebration of the London Festival of Architecture’s theme of ‘Community’ for 2016, New London Architecture and
Landscape Institute present a series of events exploring the importance of growing within London’s communities,
creating a forum for discussion around creative approaches to landscaping, the design of public spaces and the inclusion
of green infrastructure. What does community really mean in our densely populated capital and how do we make spaces
that improve the lives of those who live there?

Events include:

Why growing communities matter3 June, 1.15pm - 1.45pm

What interventions and strategies help foster a greater sense of community through the use of planting and growing?

Speakers include:
Tim Richardson, festival director of Chelsea Fringe 
Mak Gilchrist, founding director of The Edible Bus Stop 
Peter Murray, chairman of NLA (chair)

Understanding sustainable urban drainage, 10 June, 1.15pm - 1.45pm
SUDS are becoming an increasingly crucial element to consider in all development. How can SUDS result in creative and dynamic open spaces for local communities?

Speakers include:
Mark Bentley, landscape architect at Groundwork London 
Luke Greysmith, director of Greysmith Associates Landscape Architects 
Paul Lincoln, deputy chief executive of The Landscape Institute (chair)

Crowdfunding community spirit,17 June, 1.15pm - 1.45pm
How can crowdfunding be used to raise capital to complete community projects whilst enriching community spirit and create greater sense of pride-in-place? 

Speakers include:
Nick Woodford, co-founder of Peckham Coal Line
James Parkinson, senior project officer at Regeneration, GLA 
Peter Murray, chairman of NLA (chair)

Designing public space 101, 24 June, 1.15pm - 1.45pm
What are the basic tools to consider when creating a successful outdoor public space?

Speakers to be announced, chaired by Paul Lincoln, deputy cheif executive of the Landscape Institute.

This event series is part of the London Festival of Architecture.