Manchester Town Hall

As part of a £100m+ programme to improve Manchester City Council’s customer service facilities and to increase visitor numbers to the library, as well as providing greater public access to historic and archived material, the project was started in 2010 and fully completed in 2014.

The Building

Originally designed by E. Vincent Harris and built in the 1930’s Manchester Town Hall Extension is essentially Gothic in character, and provides a link to the Classical Architecture of the Central Library.
Designated Grade II* listed buildings in 1974 they hold prominent positions within the Manchester City landscape. This extremely complex project brought together a host of specialist companies within the construction industry and saw a collaborative approach between two architectural practices in the design of the buildings: Ian Simpson Architects for the Town Hall Extension and Ryder rchitecture for the Central Library.
Started in 2010 and fully completed in 2014 the work has revitalised the heart of the city and seen two giants of Manchester’s civic pride transformed into magnificent buildings that are set to serve the
community long into the future.

Commenting on the specification of the Zehnder
Multicolumn Rob Ferry, Associate Director at
BDP, M&E Consultants on the project explains,
“The original buildings were built in the 1930’s
and the design of high ceilings, large windows
and heavy masonry with exposed concrete soffits
all supported natural ventilation with the use of
radiators underneath the windows. After ruling out
the feasibility of refurbishing the existing radiators
we began searching for suitable replacements. Our
objectives were two fold; firstly to ensure sufficient
heat output for the building and then secondly, and
perhaps more importantly, to provide an appropriate
aesthetic. We wanted a radiator which was not only
in keeping with the heritage of the buildings, but
which also offered a sense of style and modernism.
After evaluating a number of different products we
all agreed that the Zehnder Multicolumn was the
best solution.”

Products

Commenting on the specification of the Zehnder Multicolumn Rob Ferry, Associate Director at BDP, M&E Consultants on the project explains,
“The original buildings were built in the 1930’s and the design of high ceilings, large windows and heavy masonry with exposed concrete soffits
all supported natural ventilation with the use of radiators underneath the windows. After ruling out the feasibility of refurbishing the existing radiators we began searching for suitable replacements. Our objectives were two fold; firstly to ensure sufficient heat output for the building and then secondly, and perhaps more importantly, to provide an appropriate
aesthetic. We wanted a radiator which was not only in keeping with the heritage of the buildings, but which also offered a sense of style and modernism.
After evaluating a number of different products we all agreed that the Zehnder Multicolumn was the best solution.”